Many of us started photography just for fun. Then we learn about the techniques. Then we learn about social media. Then photography no longer becomes fun. Rather, photography becomes a competition — seeing who can get the most “likes” and the most “followers.” To see who has the biggest lens, or the fanciest camera.

A study co-authored by Dr Liz Brewster of Lancaster University and Dr Andrew Cox of the University of Sheffield recorded what photos people took, what text they added and how they interacted with others on the photo-a-day site for two months. Taking a moment to be mindful, and looking for something different or unusual in the day were seen as positive well-being benefits of the practice.

Researchers have stated that photography is an active process of meaning-making, in which a new conceptualisation of well-being emerges. Photography could be used as a psychological tool for us to relieve stress, anxiety, and frustration in our life.

What’s more is that it also led to more exercise and gave a sense of purpose, competence and achievement.

So one needs to get out of the confines and explore the outer world and start capturing!